Sourdough Biscuits

(Melissa) #1

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(bmacpiper) #2

Made these this morning; they’re great, but holy BUTTER batman! I bake in a cast iron skillet, and these are swimming in all the excess butter that melted out of the dough. Double checked all ingredients and all was correct; I used two sticks of butter, totaling 227g/1 cup.
Thanks,
bmc

(retiredmsg) #3

this receipe is too large, can I cut in 1/2 and still get the biscuits you did?

(bmacpiper) #4

I don’t see why not. I’ve always found that keeping the butter cold, and working the dough as little as possible, gives the best biscuits. I use fingers to smash the butter into the flour quickly; much easier and faster than a pastry cutter.
Best,
bmc

(BreadBunny) #5

Best tip for evenly incorporating butter for scones: freeze the stick(s) of butter, then grate the butter using the large holes of a box grater.
I peel back the wrapper enough that I have something to hold onto until the piece of butter gets too small to leave the wrapper on.

(Melissa) #6

@bmacpiper I hear you! Midway through the bake, I was worried about the butter content – simmering situation – but then it all kinda got sucked up by the biscuits. I wonder if the space between my biscuits baked on a sheet had an impact. I’m glad you enjoyed them. Good advice about cold butter and a little hand-smooshing of it.

@retiredmsg Scaling the recipe will work fine.

@BreadBunny I’ll have to try the grating trick…maybe shortcut with a food processor : -)

(sdivecliff) #7

I have a question. In the instructions for making this recipe it says "Add cubed butter. Halfway through, break apart dough with hands. My question is, halfway through what? Mixing in the butter or just mixing the dough after all the butter is placed in the dough? Could I get a little clarification for the dummy here. I get the rest of the recipe, especially the part about not over mixing the dough. Looking forward to giving it a try. Thank you!

(Melissa) #8

Sorry about the confusion - I’ve edited to make it clearer – thanks for the heads-up.

To answer your question, yes, halfway through adding the cubed butter, break the dough apart.

The sourdough starter is gluey and wants to be it’s own blob. It seemed to stay independent of the butter if I didn’t break it apart. Once that is done and some of the butter is worked in, the consistency improves/feels more biscuit-like.

(sdivecliff) #9

These were delicious Melissa. Will be doing them again soon! Thank you.

(sdivecliff) #10

(Melissa) #11

They look amazing. And you got 16 out of the dough!

(The division of biscuits in my family was egregiously inequitable and I will make more soon to correct that lol)

(Rayford) #12

Seems like a lot of butter to me, but each to his/her own.

Why use baking powder and not baking soda, since the sourdough starter is acidic?

Thanks, for sharing!

(Melissa) #13

Yes, it is quite buttery! Just a bit less than the recipe it’s a grandchild of – Martha Stewart’s Flaky Buttery Biscuits – if you factor in the starter’s flour.

The choice of powder vs soda was a flavor decision. I hear what you’re saying, though, soda reacts with acid, and starter is acidic.